Early 2000s rappers

Whatever it is, modern hip-hop is dominated by 808s. We use the term loosely, but 808s reference the historic long bass drum sound first made popular by Roland’s TR-808 drum machine. In today’s production world, it’s hard to find a big hip-hop hit without an 808 or sub bass. These trunk-rattling frequencies are a crucial part of the genre.

Elise Dewsberry’s “Singing Sixty Birthday Recording” campaign lacks a pitch video, but the project is as heart-warming as they come. She does a pretty good job of selling it, too.

Learn more on Soundfly: Check out Soundfly’s free online course, Touring on a Shoestring, and get better at booking, managing, and promoting your DIY tours in a matter of hours! Here’s a video from the course!

Educational leadership foundation grants

The riff itself starts out on the root, jumps up to the octave and walks down a full step, and then a half step before dropping back down to the root and beginning a walk back up. Layer that with some aggressive cello triplets, and a soaring electro-theremin riff, and you’ve got the backbone of what Brian Wilson called a “pocket symphony.”

Imagine for a moment the Library of Congress. It’s the largest collection of books and documents in the world, all perfectly categorized. Imagine, one morning, a group of people go into the library and spend all day moving thousands of books and documents around, swapping or removing the labels. Chaos!

Just like your mind and your muscles, your ears also have a shelf life. Go too long without taking a break, and you’ll run the risk of not being able to separate good takes from bad ones. It might sound odd to recommend taking breaks as a time-saving tool for home-recording, but keeping your dexterity as well as your listening skills sharp will protect you from making costly recording mistakes.

From contemplative songwriting, to epic beats, to carefully crafted orchestrations, September’s student artists have created some memorable pieces in their Mainstage courses. Over several weeks of detailed content, constrained prompts, and personal feedback and support from a Soundfly Mentor, these students were able to explore and develop musical skills in areas like production, composition, and performance. Here are a few highlights:

Remember, you can break words up with a motif, like in “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.”  “Some-where” gets split in half by an octave because the songwriter wanted to really draw our attention to the idea of longing for this magical place, reaching up to the next octave like it’s up in the sky.

Waterwheel foundation

Remember above when we identified that Houston uses the notes 1, 3, and 5 more in the chorus than the verse? Those notes are hierarchically more important, and so they appear in the most important section of a song: the chorus. The chorus is hierarchically more important from a structural standpoint, so part of the reason this song is so effective at creating a memorable musical experience is that it joins predictable notes with their predictable placement in the song.

If all this talk on tensions is a little overwhelming, relax. I’ll dig deeper into them in the next article and show how they can be used to create some beautiful melodic content. For now, perhaps the most important lesson is that there is something to be learned musically from every artist, even perpetually teenaged Canadians.

With overwhelmingly positive results, we’re happy to share a few testimonials of Soundfly’s Orchestration For Strings course directly from our students.

To help you navigate the vast world of music-related website resources out there, we picked out eight of our favorite web tools that are made specifically for musicians, so you know you’re in good hands with each of them.

Additionally, we know that each fret will raise the intonation by a half-step. So for example, if we play just the 6th string and move up one fret at a time, progressively we’ll get the following notes: