Tag: Old school rappers 2000

Companies willing to donate to fundraisers

“The Luv Pack, Vol. 1,” is comprised of samples created by producer, drummer, bandleader, and author of Soundfly’s The Art of Hip-Hop Production course, Charles Burchell. As a bass player, I have been lucky enough to play a little with Charles over the years, and it has always been an instant hook up for me. His pocket is on another level and given that his raw playing features heavily in the source material for these samples, I knew I could get inspired by digging into the drum loops first.

My company, Full English Post, works on all sorts of audio projects including TV shows, films, commercials, documentaries, and podcasts. I produce, record, edit, and mix the Mixmag On Rotation weekly podcast, which keeps me on my toes to yield quick turnarounds and a well-produced product.

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Music for relief

Dub music producers like King Tubby and Lee “Scratch” Perry played the Space Echo almost as if it were its own instrument. On Augustus Pablo’s song “555 Dub Street,” Lee Perry uses the Space Echo on the melodica and turns what most consider a harsh, uninviting instrument into something lush and layered.

Our Soundfly Mentorship program is built on our belief that accountability and guidance can have a huge impact on helping students reach their goals and develop their musical identities. We currently offer mentorship with seven courses, including those mentioned earlier, as well as a Beta program called the Headliners Club. Our mentors are passionate, experienced musicians with a shared love of personalized learning and artistic curiosity.

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Hip hop artists

I’d like to see if you have [dates] available for a show I’m putting together. I’ve reached out to [band 1], [band 2], and [band 3] to headline, and I can lock at least one of them down once we have the venue and date confirmed. I’ve included links to all of the artists’ music and their bios below.

Eventually, the bass line drops down an octave and changes its stubborn pedaling to play chord tones along with the rest of the rhythm section. It starts with the same old D and A. Next, it moves to C♯ and A for the A chord. Then it moves to the B chord but still keeps the pressure on with that non-chord-tone A. Finally, it rounds off with a pleasant, resolute walk-up, bouncing back up between notes of the major scale and A, which is the root of the chord. Classic!

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